Home Career How Much Money Can You Make By Teaching English In Korea? – 2022 Guide

How Much Money Can You Make By Teaching English In Korea? – 2022 Guide

by Ava-Rose Calderon

Korea is one of the most popular destinations for English teachers looking to work overseas. This lively country, located in the center of Asia, provides teachers with a unique opportunity to immerse themselves in a unique culture utterly different from the West, all while building significant relationships with kids.

One of the first questions you’ll probably have if you’re thinking about teaching English in Korea is how much money you can expect to make.  To compare that salary to others, check out a site such as https://mint.intuit.com/salary/.

After all, you’ll need to make sure you have enough money to cover your basic living expenses while living in a foreign nation. So keep reading for a full explanation of what to expect in terms of pay when teaching in Korea.

Salary for Teaching English in Korea

The wage for teaching English in Korea varies from school to school and depends on the region where you are working. Working in the capital will almost certainly result in a higher salary due to the higher cost of living. To learn more about teaching life in Korea, visit teast.co.

1. Salary in public schools

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When it comes to teaching English in Korea, working in a public school is one of the better options. You will be hired as a government employee and will attend public schools around the country.

The starting income for teaching English in Korea is between 1.8 and 2.1 million krw, which is roughly $1600 to $1900 per month before taxes. Teachers with experience might earn between 2.0 and 2.7 million krw ($1800 – $2500) per year. It varies from school to school and also depends on the region, although it is relatively consistent across the country.

When you work in a public school, you will frequently be given the opportunity to work overtime or at English camps over the summer, which will be compensated in addition to your monthly income. You will receive around 18 days of paid vacation and leaves on all national holidays if you work in a public school.

2. Online teaching

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You don’t have to be in Korea to teach online when you can teach from anywhere. It’s very likely that you’ll be instructing Korean children or adults. The pay for teaching English online varies depending on the company. Depending on expertise, full-time online teachers can earn anywhere from $1500 to $2500 per month.

To work as an online teacher, you must have a bachelor’s degree, be a native English speaker, and have additional certifications, such as TEFL. HigherEdJobs, Inside Higher Ed, Indeed, and other similar websites are excellent places to start your online teaching job search.

3. Salary in universities

University teaching jobs are the best form of teaching employment in Korea, but they’re also the most competitive and most challenging to come by, particularly in Seoul. As a result, the university teaching criteria are more stringent; most positions require a master’s degree plus a few years of experience teaching English in public or private schools.

The salary is higher than other teaching jobs, the teaching hours are minimum (maybe as low as 8 hours per week), the pupils are older and more mature, and there is a four-month paid vacation.

The starting pay for an English professor at a university is 2.3 million krw, with the possibility of earning up to 3.5 million krw. It will be determined entirely by your background and the university you attend. Foreigners should pursue university roles since they pay well.

4. Salary of a tutor

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When working on an E2 visa, tutoring English is unlawful and can result in hefty fines or deportation from Korea. However, it is an extremely lucrative career that is legal on an F visa. Private English tutors work one-on-one with children and adults. For new teachers, the hourly rate starts at roughly 40,000 krw and can reach 120,000 krw when teaching business or advanced English.

Many E2 teachers continue to tutor extra students despite the risk of getting caught. Most illicit teaching gigs go undetected, so be cautious about who you accept as a pupil and who you tell about your additional earning opportunities.

Other Benefits Of Teaching English In Korea

English teachers in Korea can expect many great benefits in addition to a decent salary. These benefits can help you save a lot of money. Free housing, a resigning bonus, severance compensation, and a pension are all possible extra bonuses.

1. Free Housing

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Free lodging is one of the best perks of English teaching jobs in Korea. A majority of English teaching jobs include a rent-free flat for the teacher. As a result, you will be able to save all the money you would typically pay on rent.

When it comes to housing benefits, you usually have two choices. You have the option of living in school-provided accommodation or receiving a housing stipend of roughly 400,000 KRW.

2. Severance Pay

English teachers also receive severance money, which is a fantastic benefit. This benefit is legally available to all full-time employees in Korea.

In Korea, every full-time employee who has worked for the same company for at least 12 months is entitled to an additional month’s wage for each year worked.

3. Complimentary Airfare

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Flights are entirely free. Many English teaching jobs in Korea include complimentary flights to and from your home country.

It usually takes the form of reimbursement once you’ve arrived in Korea and started teaching. Flights to and from Korea are compensated for 1,300,000 KRW for EPIK teaching positions.

The free airfare granted for other teaching professions varies from contract to contract. A majority of contracts include at least one round-trip flight.

Conclusion

In Korea, you may expect to make a solid living teaching English. Many English teachers return home from their time in Korea with no student or credit card debt, modest savings, and a passport full of extra stamps. As a teacher in Korea, you can fulfill your passion for working with students while earning a handsome amount on the job. Overall, regardless of where you land on the salary range, this is a reasonably fantastic offer!